AACF Assisting Aftermarket Industry Families Affected by Hawaii Fires

AACF Assisting Aftermarket Industry Families Affected by Hawaii Fires

The devastating Lahaina fires have left a trail of destruction, impacting not only properties but also the lives of countless families in the automotive aftermarket industry. In these trying times, the Automotive Aftermarket Charitable Foundation (AACF) is stepping forward to provide much-needed support to the affected families.

The Lahaina fires have been an unprecedented disaster, displacing families, disrupting businesses and causing distress to industry partners. In light of these circumstances, the AACF has rallied its resources and expertise to extend a helping hand to the aftermarket industry families who have been hit hardest.

The AACF's commitment to supporting aftermarket industry companies and their teammates welfare is evident in their swift response to crises. With a focus on collaboration, the organization has established a dedicated relief fund to provide financial assistance to the families grappling with the aftermath of the fires. This initiative not only addresses the immediate needs of these families but also underscores the AACF's dedication to recovery efforts.

"During times of crisis, it is essential for the aftermarket industry to come together and support one another," said Joel Ayres, executive director of AACF. "We understand the challenges that these families are facing, and our goal is to offer them a helping hand, reminding them that they are not alone in this journey toward recovery."

The AACF has a track record of effectively responding to emergencies, ensuring swift aid reaches those in the industry who need it most. If you or someone you know needs help, contact AACF through www.aftermarketcharity.org/get-help, by email at info@aftermarketcharity.org or by calling 772-286-5500. 

For more information, contact Ayres at Joel@AftermarketCharity.org.

Source: AACF
 

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