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John Yoswick

John YoswickJohn Yoswick is a freelance automotive writer based in Portland, Oregon, who has been writing about the collision industry since 1988. He is the editor of the weekly CRASH Network (for a free 4-week trial subscription, visit www.CrashNetwork.com).


He can be contacted at john@crashnetwork.com 

Wednesday, 09 February 2022 12:53

Automakers: Collision Repairers Must Ensure ADAS Calibration Procedures Are Followed

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Scott Kaboos of American Honda said testing at the automaker’s training center demonstrated the need to perform ADAS calibrations on a level floor when called for in the procedures. Scott Kaboos of American Honda said testing at the automaker’s training center demonstrated the need to perform ADAS calibrations on a level floor when called for in the procedures.

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The importance of proper ADAS calibrations was a key focus as the Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) brought collision repairers and automakers together at an event in Las Vegas during the SEMA Show.

Scott Kaboos, assistant manager of collision repair training and technology for American Honda, told those attending the OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit that automakers call for many calibrations to be done on a level floor with good reason.

 

“We did a little test,” Kaboos said, noting Honda’s service information says there can be no more than 1 degree of pitch or slope to the floor when performing calibrations. Traveling around to a lot of our dealerships, we found that most of their floors do not meet that requirement. So we started asking ourselves: How important is this? Is this really detrimental?”

 

Kaboos said the Honda training center in Illinois drove a new Civic at the NHTSA target used to test emergency auto-braking, and the system worked 10 times in a row, stopping the vehicle three or four feet from the target as designed.

 

“So then we took that same car and put the rear wheels in our drain in our wash bay at our training center,” Kaboos said. “We calculated the slope on that, and found that the car was sitting at a 1.6 degree incline. We re-aimed the radar, using the factory specifications and tools. When we were done, the scan tool said aiming was complete. There were no codes. We test drove the car around the block. It gave us no indication there was anything wrong with the car. There were no lights on the dash.”

 

But then the vehicle was driven at the same NHTSA target.

 

“We had very different results,” Kaboos said. “It honestly blew through that target at 20 miles an hour like it wasn’t even there. The light on the dash didn’t blink. It didn’t beep at us. It just punted that target. That was a big eye-opener to us on the training side as to how important that one little line in the service information is: do this on a flat floor.”

 

Kaboos said the other noted requirements---proper air in the tires, a full tank of gas---are also important.

 

“Anything that changes the ride height or ride angle of the car is going to throw off all the geometry,” he said. “You’ve got to pay attention to all of that.”

 

Subaru of America’s Ted Hicks said during the same SCRS session that...


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