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John Yoswick

John YoswickJohn Yoswick is a freelance automotive writer based in Portland, Oregon, who has been writing about the collision industry since 1988. He is the editor of the weekly CRASH Network (for a free 4-week trial subscription, visit www.CrashNetwork.com).


He can be contacted at john@crashnetwork.com 

Tuesday, 30 November 2021 14:07

MSOs Discuss Collision Parts Challenges, Increased Work-in-Progress

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The panel discussing parts supply chain issues at the MSO Symposium included, pictured left to right, Mark Miller, Shawn Hezar, Darrell Amberson and Marty Evans.  The panel discussing parts supply chain issues at the MSO Symposium included, pictured left to right, Mark Miller, Shawn Hezar, Darrell Amberson and Marty Evans. 

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A panel of representatives from a number of multi-shop collision repair operations at the MSO Symposium in Las Vegas in November discussed how disruptions in the parts supply chain are impacting their business.

All agreed the parts challenges are not limited to any particular parts segments, including new OEM, used and non-OEM.

 

“I think we have problems in all categories,” said Marty Evans, an MSO operator in Washington who also is COO of the Certified Collision Group banner network.

 

Shawn Hezar, chief client officer for Caliber Collision, agreed all the parts industry segments are facing the same challenges, in terms of labor and logistics.

 

“I live in Los Angeles where we can actually see the ships lined up, waiting to be docked,” he said. “And of course once they get docked, you still need trucks and people to unload them. It’s evolving, and it’s pretty painful.”

 

Darrell Amberson, president of operations for LaMettry’s Collision, which has 10 collision repair shops and three mechanical shops in Minnesota, concurred.

 

“We’re seeing it among Asian manufacturers, Europeans, domestics,” Amberson said. “It often feels like we can build three-fourths of the job or even more, but too often there’s that one critical part---even a common part, like a bumper cover---that we’re waiting months for.”

 

Hezar said that type of situation now means Caliber has “somewhere about $50 million to $60 million of work-in-progress…with cars sitting in parking lots, waiting to be finalized.”

 

Amberson, too, said his company has seen an increase of between 10% and 20% in his company’s work-in-progress compared to pre-pandemic.

 

“It’s a mixed blessing because in today’s world we almost have to have more work-in-progress to keep our people busy,” Amberson said. “Because there are too many jobs for which we’re waiting for insurance authorization or parts. But the downside is...


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