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If you think the collision repair industry is changing rapidly, spend a little time talking with the owner of your nearby auto salvage yard: 

Seemingly conceding that its previous position on estimating system data was untenable, ADP announced in April it was putting on hold its plan to encrypt that data and make it unusable by unlicensed third parties such as Internet claims management companies. 

California State Senator Jackie Speier (D - San Francisco/San Mateo) predicted that "there will be a battle in the legislature over quality crash parts" within the next year and that she may be "promulgating rules on anti-steering," an issue on which she expects State Insurance Commissioner Harry W. Low to take an aggressive attitude. 

It is time for our community to call upon the true authority of the 1963 Consent Decree and utilize it as a tool to bring about a substantial change in the method in which consumer claims are handled in our collision repair environment. 

When Allstate Corporation last month acquired Sterling Collision Centers Inc., a consolidator with 39 collision repair shops in seven states and nine metropolitan areas, it started a shockwave that resonated across the industry with as much thunder as the State Farm non-OEM parts verdict. 

"If you're a good shop, you have nothing to worry about. If you're a bad shop, you have every reason to be concerned!" warned the California Bureau of Automotive Repair's Robert Trent. Trent, who works out of BAR's Oceanside office, was addressing the San Diego chapter of California Autobody Association at their July meeting. Trent and his associate Bill Neu discussed the BAR inspection program that began July 1. The inspection program was created by the Auto Insurance Fraud Act (SB 1998) of 2000.