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Anyone who lived through the 1960s knows what a turbulent time it was politically, socially and culturally. There were some profound changes in the collision repair trade as well.

The decade of the ‘50s marked a golden era in the auto industry. American servicemen were back from the war. No longer were factories turning out bombs and bullets. It was time to build some cars that were destined to be classics---and time to introduce some new automotive technology.

Tuesday, 06 November 2018 21:54

How Safe Is a Collision-Repaired Police Vehicle?

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We’ve all seen them on television shows, movies and of course in real life---police cruisers all smashed-up, usually as a result of an accident, sometimes sustaining collateral damage when forcing a “bad-guy” off the road, sometimes damaged at the end of a high-speed chase.

Thursday, 30 August 2018 17:18

Vision, Foresight Help Launch This PBE Jobber

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It was the mid-1940s. GIs were home from the war, the U.S. economy was booming and shiny new cars were filling America’s highways---cars that needed gasoline and service work.

Tuesday, 21 August 2018 21:37

In Reverse: 120 Years of Body-Building Changes

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The first auto body designers and builders represented what was already an old established craft.

 

By 1943, WWII was in full swing.  There were no new cars; tires and gasoline were rationed, and the American public wasn’t driving very far ... or bothering to renew their auto insurance. 

 

The 1940s marked the end of the Great Depression as America was thrust into WWII. 

 

Duke Norman

Recently, Collision Safety Consultants (CSC), based in Belmont, NC, announced the opening of eight new locations.

The 1930s ushered in the biggest financial calamity of all time: the Great Depression.