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Wednesday, 06 July 2022 09:52

High School Students Introduced to Collision Repair at Contra Costa College’s Summer Camp

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Laura Lozano, Contra Costa College professor of collision repair technology and co-chair of the automotive department, with high school students at the schools' first Auto Tech Summer Camp. Laura Lozano, Contra Costa College professor of collision repair technology and co-chair of the automotive department, with high school students at the schools' first Auto Tech Summer Camp.

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Educators are looking for new and different ways to attract students to their auto tech programs, many of which are struggling as they come out of the pandemic.

This year’s summer camp at Contra Costa College (CCC) in San Pablo, CA, is a perfect example of thinking outside the box to get high school students interested in both collision and mechanical repair as a career.

 

The two-day training session, held in mid-June as part of the school’s collision engineering apprenticeship program, hosted 15 high school students, with many CCC graduates on hand to help out.

 

Representatives from Bay Area companies attended the camp as well, including B & S Hacienda Auto Body from Pleasanton, CA; Mercedes-Benz of Walnut Creek; Barsotti’s Body and Fender from San Rafael, CA; and 3M. The program’s former director, Peter Lock, taught some of the training sessions.

 

CCC Summer Camp 2 web

Nick Gale, Contra Costa College automotive services faculty member, was one of the featured instructors at the school’s two-day Auto Tech Summer Camp.

 

Laura Lozano, a professor of collision repair technology and co-chair of the automotive department, was delighted to coordinate the CCC summer camp with leading Bay Area companies.

 

“Sharing our knowledge and experience with these high school students is crucial for us,” Lozano said. “It was only two days, but I know we gave them a ton of information, which was the goal. Industry support is also really important to us. We have established good relationships with some great body shops and product manufacturers and distributors, and we value their involvement.”

Lozano always wants to teach the newest techniques in the collision repair industry through events such as the CCC summer camp.

 

“We want our students to succeed, and knowing the newest technology is a huge part of that,” she said. “If we’re going to build enrollment, we need to show these young people that we are teaching them cutting-edge collision repair processes and using the latest tools, equipment and products.”

 

Now Lozano will be looking at 2023 for next year’s summer camp.

 

“On behalf of our CCC students, faculty and staff, we want to express our gratitude for their continuing support,” Lozano said. “We were able to get...


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