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Stacey Phillips

Stacey Phillips photoStacey Phillips is a freelance writer for the automotive industry based in Southern California. She has 20 years of experience as an editor including writing in a number of businesses and fields.

 

She can be reached at sphillips.autobodynews@gmail.com. 

 

According to surveys conducted by Phoenix Solutions Group (PSG), close to 80 percent of body shop customers choose a collision repair facility that they feel has their best interests at heart.

Keith Manich of the Automotive Training Institute (ATI) said collision repairers tell him on a regular basis that they often hear the word “no” when asking to be paid for required procedures associated with the repair plan, and that they “feel intimidated.”

Adaptive Cruise Control, Blind Spot Information and Collision Mitigation Braking Systems are just a few of the Advanced Driver Assist Systems (ADAS) in vehicles today.

As new vehicles are introduced to the market, often equipped with complex technology, the collision industry is challenged with keeping up-to-date with repair procedures.

When talking about industry training, most collision repairers typically assume such training is technically oriented. 

Growing up in Southern California, Kye Yeung always had a passion for cars.

Nearly 20 years ago, Tim Ronak said he was frustrated with the way shops were being judged on KPIs. 

Prior to opening Exclusive Auto Collision in 2003 in Ramsey, NJ, Tony Lake was an auto damage appraiser for 20 years.

Taking the time to mentally reinvest in your business, attend hands-on training and understand your shop’s limitations can all help you run a successful collision repair facility, according to Mark Allen, collision programs manager for Audi USA.

By implementing the blueprinting process, collision repairers are finding that hidden damage can often be uncovered before the vehicle is repaired.