fbpx
Monday, 01 March 2021 17:45

Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety Support Alabama Bill to Upgrade Distracted Driving Law

Index

Share This:


On Feb. 5, Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety sent a letter to the Alabama Committee on Public Safety and Homeland Security in support of House Bill (HB) 90. 

The legislation would improve safety on Alabama roads by broadening the current prohibition on drivers from using wireless communication devices to read, write or send text messages while operating a motor vehicle to include distracting viewing of non-navigational content and manual use.  

 

The letter was sent to Rep. Allen Treadaway and Rep. Allen Farley, chair and vice chair of the Committee on Public Safety and Homeland Security:

 

Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety (Advocates), an alliance of consumer, safety, medical, public health and law enforcement groups, and insurance companies working together to pass highway and auto safety laws that prevent crashes, save lives, reduce injuries and curb costs, urges you to support House Bill (HB) 90.

 

This legislation will improve safety on Alabama roads by broadening the current prohibition on drivers from using wireless communication devices to read, write or send text messages while operating a motor vehicle to include distracting viewing of non-navigational content and manual use.

 

Considering the prevalence of distracted driving crashes, this legislation is critical, responsive and timely. In 2019, 930 people were killed on Alabama roads, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

 

Wireless communication device distraction, which includes manual, visual and cognitive components, is a serious issue contributing to crashes and deaths. According to the NHTSA, the percentage of drivers visibly manipulating hand-held devices while driving increased by 250% between 2009 and 2016.

 

The NHTSA survey, National Telephone Survey on Distracted Driving Attitudes and Behaviors---2015," noted that twice as many respondents admitted to talking on a cell phone or texting when they were involved in a crash or a near crash in 2015 as compared to 2010.

 

Additionally, a survey performed by Nationwide Insurance found...


Previous Page Continue reading »

Read 686 times