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John Yoswick

John YoswickJohn Yoswick is a freelance automotive writer based in Portland, Oregon, who has been writing about the collision industry since 1988. He is the editor of the weekly CRASH Network (for a free 4-week trial subscription, visit www.CrashNetwork.com).


He can be contacted at john@crashnetwork.com 

Tuesday, 21 November 2017 16:57

Retro News: Five Years Ago, Information Providers said Shops Can’t Opt-out of Data Collection

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In 2012, Greg Horn was with Mitchell International, and defended the company’s release of data that showed regional variations in billing for bumper refinishing. In 2012, Greg Horn was with Mitchell International, and defended the company’s release of data that showed regional variations in billing for bumper refinishing.

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He cited, as one example of the concerns repairers have about the use of data, a report published by Mitchell International on differences seen in bumper refinish costs. Schulenburg said some insurers used the report to urge field staff not to overpay on bumper refinish on certain vehicles. But Schulenburg said the differences in the costs were more attributable to differences on estimates than on what was actually happening in shops. The data may seem to indicate that older vehicles need less time, he said, but it’s actually more an issue of appraisers not being as likely to allow procedures such as tinting and final sand and polish on estimates for older cars as they are on newer cars. The estimate data that Mitchell was touting as a trend, Schulenburg said, didn’t reflect that those procedures are still being done on the older vehicles.


But Greg Horn of Mitchell International said the report was actually pointing out that additional bumper refinish operations, such as tint and blend, vary by geographic region.


 “So why are the body shop associations not reading that same report and saying, ‘Why are our brethren down in the Southeast or up in the Northeast getting this when it’s a valid operation, but we’re not in this area,’” Horn suggested.


Audatex’s Rick Tuuri said his company and the other information providers cannot control how other companies use the data.

 

“Your issue is not with the information. Your issue is with how the information is being used,” Tuuri suggested to the associations. “People use power tools for the wrong reason every day, and you don’t go to Black & Decker and complain that someone tried to pound a nail with your power drill and put a hole in their hand. It’s not Black & Decker’s fault.”

 

– As reported in CRASH Network (www.CrashNetwork.com), December 3, 2012. Schulenburg remains executive director of SCRS; Tuuri retired from Audatex in 2016; Horn in 2016 became national auto physical damage claims director at The Hartford.


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