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Monday, 03 January 2022 19:40

New York Becomes Latest State to Pass Peer-to-Peer Car Sharing Law

Written by Steve Bittenbender, The Center Square
Heavy traffic backs up on the Williamsburg Bridge during rush hour in New York City in 2016. The bridge connects Lower Manhattan with the borough of Brooklyn. Heavy traffic backs up on the Williamsburg Bridge during rush hour in New York City in 2016. The bridge connects Lower Manhattan with the borough of Brooklyn. Ryan DeBerardinis/Shutterstock.com

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A new law in New York now allows for peer-to-peer car sharing in the state, a move proponents claim will provide new economic opportunities for residents.

Car sharing allows residents to offer their personal vehicles for short-term rentals.

 

Gov. Kathy Hochul signed S6715/A2349 into law in late December. Sponsored by Sen. Neil Breslin, D-Albany, and former Assemblyman (now Acting Secretary of State) Robert Rodriguez, D-Manhattan, the new law allows companies managing peer-to-peer programs to purchase group insurance. It also establishes taxes that will be used to fund mass transit and public transportation programs.

 

“Economic progress is often driven by marshaling available resources more efficiently rather than simply creating new resources,” wrote Breslin, who chairs the Senate Committee on Insurance, in the bill’s justification statement. “And history has taught us that when technological progress leads to more efficient production, such technologies have the potential to make a positive overall economic impact.”

 

The legislation had the support of the Chamber of Progress. It’s a national technology public policy organization that counts companies like Amazon, Apple, Google and Uber as corporate partners.

 

In a letter sent to Hochul urging her to sign the bill, the chamber said peer-to-peer car sharing will promote more effective use of private vehicles and can ease transit issues across the state.

 

Montana Williams, the chamber’s director of state and local public policy, told Hochul studies show most vehicles are not in use up to 95% of the time, and those idled vehicles can take up a lot of land within cities.

 

“Peer-to-peer car sharing services put privately-owned vehicles to more efficient use by...


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