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Friday, 03 September 2021 16:02

Officials Vow to Bolster Infrastructure After Ida's Remnants Slam NYC, Killing 9

Written by Steve Bittenbender, The Center Square
New York Gov. Kathy Hochul, accompanied by New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio, right, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards, left, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and other state and local officials, speaks Sept. 2 during a news conference in Queens. New York Gov. Kathy Hochul, accompanied by New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio, right, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards, left, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and other state and local officials, speaks Sept. 2 during a news conference in Queens. Darren McGee/Office of the New York Governor

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New York Gov. Kathy Hochul spent Sept. 2 in the New York City area to get a firsthand account of the devastation caused by Sept. 1’s historic storm that reportedly killed at least nine people in the city, according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

As the remnants of Hurricane Ida moved across the northeastern U.S., it pounded downstate New York with such unexpected force the National Weather Service issued a flash flood emergency, a first for New York City.

 

“This was an exceedingly rare event with 6-10” of rainfall falling over a several hour period,” the service’s New York City office posted on its Twitter page early Sept. 2. “Take these warnings (and emergencies) seriously!!”

 

The weather service reported 7.19 inches of rain at Central Park, 6.89 inches at LaGuardia Airport and 8.44 inches across the Hudson in Newark, NJ. Those were record totals for Newark and LaGuardia and the fifth-highest one-day total for Central Park.

 

Hochul spoke at a news conference in Queens late in the morning Sept. 2 with de Blasio, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-NY, and other local and state leaders. The three said the storm shows the need to bolster the city’s infrastructure and make it more resilient.

 

“We haven’t experienced this before, but we should expect it the next time,” she said.

 

Both Schumer and de Blasio expanded upon the governor’s comment, saying the storm itself was a result of global warming.

 

Like the governor, they said it represents what New Yorkers will face from future storms.

 

“Woe is us if we don’t do something about it quickly, both in...


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