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Wednesday, 18 September 2019 20:20

AASP/NJ Panel Discussion Addresses ADAS Growth in Industry

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AASP/NJ provided an overview of what collision repair shop owners need to know about ADAS technology by hosting a panel discussion on the topic at the Gran Centurions in Clark, NJ, on Sept.12. (Panelists pictured from L to R: George Lesniak of Autel, Autel’s Michael Flink, Paul Stern from LIFTNOW, Chuck Leonard of Autopart International, Inc., and VECO Experts’ Mark Olson). AASP/NJ provided an overview of what collision repair shop owners need to know about ADAS technology by hosting a panel discussion on the topic at the Gran Centurions in Clark, NJ, on Sept.12. (Panelists pictured from L to R: George Lesniak of Autel, Autel’s Michael Flink, Paul Stern from LIFTNOW, Chuck Leonard of Autopart International, Inc., and VECO Experts’ Mark Olson). AASP/NJ & Greco Publishing

Index

On Thursday, Sept. 12, AASP/NJ provided an overview of what collision repair shop owners need to know about ADAS technology by hosting a panel discussion on the topic at the Gran Centurions in Clark, NJ.

The panel discussion, moderated by AASP/NJ President Jerry McNee, featured industry experts including Mark Olson of VECO ExpertsAutel’s George LesniakMichael Flink from AutelLIFTNOW’s Paul Stern, and Chuck Leonard of Autopart International, Inc. The discussion was sponsored in part by USI North America.

 

The panel commenced with participating panelists emphasizing that the collision repair and automotive industries cannot simply ignore ADAS. Olson stated, “As a repairer, you are supposed to know that you have to do the calibration. You have to do the research ... When you touch a car, you are responsible for everything, whether you know it or not. You can't say, 'I didn't know,' because ignorance is not self-defense.”

 

Providing a variety of examples, Lesniak explored the necessary steps for resetting cameras and sensors accurately, noting that OEMs have established these steps for a reason. Unless all of the correct steps are taken, there is no guarantee that sensors have been reset to their accurate zero-point calibration. Lesniak said, “If we touch it, move it and take something off and put it back, it needs to be calibrated. I know people say, 'Well, I never had a problem before.' Well, how do you know? And what if?”

 

Flink added, “Take the time to do it, and do it correctly,” and Olson, who emphasized the importance of tracking each part of the repair in a “bulletproof file,” contributed, “If you don't document yourself - even if you are not wrong - you are going to lose.”

 

Because of the prevalence of ADAS technology, calibration is even required during wheel alignments, and Stern explained that these systems “rely on knowing exactly where 'straight-ahead' is. When you are going 80 miles an hour, it will make a big difference.”

 

On the topic of insurers that object to compensating collision repair shops for pre- and post-repair scans, attendees were advised to use concrete data to educate adjusters on the necessity of these items.


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