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Thursday, 28 March 2019 22:50

Mike Anderson Debuts ‘Scanning Best Practices’ at NORTHEAST 2019

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On the first night of AASP/NJ’s NORTHEAST® automotive services show, Mike Anderson of Collision Advice debuted a brand new course, “Scanning Best Practices.” On the first night of AASP/NJ’s NORTHEAST® automotive services show, Mike Anderson of Collision Advice debuted a brand new course, “Scanning Best Practices.”

Index

 

“Japanese values prevent their manuals from requiring something because the concept of ‘require’ is considered disrespectful,” he taught. “Their recommendation means that you need to do it; don’t question their authority on the vehicles they create.”

 

Another common objection that Anderson has heard is that no warning lights fired, but he pointed out that not every feature on a vehicle has an associated warning light. He also reminded attendees that all OEMs indicate that DTCs will be stored and suggested using the documentation to help overcome that objection.

 

Offering the key to reimbursement, Anderson insisted that repairers research every vehicle, determine what is fair and reasonable, determine what is included and not-included in labor time, understand that it’s about more than just scanning, search key terms in OEM repair procedures, and build a defendable repair plan.

 

“If you want to get paid for scans, you can’t rely on position statements,” he said. “You need to research the specific operations in the OEM procedures to find that information showing it requires a scan. It’s all about building a bulletproof estimate and examining OEM repair procedures in advance to demonstrate why scans are required for specific line items. Remember, you are the repair professional; you are the expert!”

 

Moving on to terminology, Anderson provided a list of words to search to prove why a scan is necessary. He provided examples of procedures that require checks that can only be completed using a scan tool and pointed out the importance of thoroughly reading procedures because many operations require test drives at various distances and speeds. He also encouraged shops to review the vehicle owner’s manual with their customers to get the customer on board with vehicle scans.

 

Anderson then emphasized the importance of accuracy during calibrations.

 

“When you do a calibration, if it’s off by just one degree, it will impact the vehicle’s ability to stop by 10 feet,” he said. “The calibration game is a very serious game. You need to start thinking about calibration and investing in the space needed to do it properly. A lot of people are overwhelmed by calibration, but I see it as an opportunity, along with scanning, to widen the gap between good and bad shops.”


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