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Thursday, 28 March 2019 22:50

Mike Anderson Debuts ‘Scanning Best Practices’ at NORTHEAST 2019

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On the first night of AASP/NJ’s NORTHEAST® automotive services show, Mike Anderson of Collision Advice debuted a brand new course, “Scanning Best Practices.” On the first night of AASP/NJ’s NORTHEAST® automotive services show, Mike Anderson of Collision Advice debuted a brand new course, “Scanning Best Practices.”

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On the first night of AASP/NJ’s NORTHEAST® automotive services show, Mike Anderson from Collision Advice debuted a new course, “Scanning Best Practices,” to a jam-packed room of eager pupils.

 

After having attendees introduce themselves and providing his own background information, Anderson explained that the evening’s presentation would be a condensed version of an eight-hour class he recently developed on scanning and how to overcome objections.

 

Based on information from his quarterly “Who Pays for What?” surveys, Anderson shared that, on average, when a vehicle system calibration requires the use of OEM targets or weights, shops say they obtain the necessary equipment to do calibrations in-house 27 percent of the time. Additionally, only 15 percent of shops perform a pre-scan on every vehicle, while 1 percent of shops never pre-scan vehicles. Twenty-one percent of shops reported they perform post-repair scans on every vehicle, and less than 1 percent reported they never perform a post-scan.

 

Anderson then explored how shops charge for scanning services, illustrating the lack of consistency across the industry.

 

“As you can see, labor times for what shops charge vary greatly,” he said. “This causes confusion and difficulty in getting reimbursement from third-party payers. What is ‘fair and reasonable?’ Most insurance companies don’t have a problem paying for scans, but they want it to be fair and reasonable. I want to give you clarity on how to overcome common objections from third-party payers, how to justify resources to provide it is ‘required,’ what should be included and/or not-included, and how to determine what is fair and reasonable for reimbursement.”

 

Anderson then explained that a high-end vehicle has 100 million lines of code, while an F-35 Fighter Jet has 24 million.

 

“This code controls everything from tire pressure to collision avoidance, braking, back-up, steering and other systems,” he said. “We are working on highly complex devices, and that’s what has led OEMs to come out with position statements on pre- and post-scans.”

 

Anderson emphasized the importance of understanding that there are multiple operations that require the use of a scan or diagnostic tool. He provided a list that includes, but is not limited to, pre-repair scans, post-repair scans, initializations, calibrations, relearns and resynchronizations.


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