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Friday, 24 May 2019 18:25

ASA Presents 'Stop Reacting and Start Succeeding' Webinar

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ASA hosted its monthly Webinar Wednesday, featuring “Stop Reacting and Start Succeeding” with Rick White of 180 BIZ Solutions. ASA hosted its monthly Webinar Wednesday, featuring “Stop Reacting and Start Succeeding” with Rick White of 180 BIZ Solutions. Chasidy Rae Sisk

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On May 15, the Automotive Service Association (ASA) hosted its monthly Webinar Wednesday, featuring “Stop Reacting and Start Succeeding” with Rick White of 180 BIZ Solutions.

White encouraged attendees to identify their management style, look at how it impacts overall performance and recognize modified steps to get the most out of their teams. Tony Molla, ASA vice president, welcomed attendees and explained how they can earn AMi credits. Then, Molla introduced White.

 

White began by explaining that most shop owners constantly function in “react mode.”

 

“There’s no growth; no plan. It’s just survival, and there’s pain because you realize there’s more on the table, but you don’t know how to grasp it or believe you’re capable of achieving it,” said White. “My goal is to help you move closer to achieving your dream.”

 

The goals of the seminar included: learning how to get more done in fewer hours, understanding how to modify your behavior to get results and how to feel like a winner when you go home every day. Keeping these goals in mind, White identified two typical management styles: the bad and the ugly. The bad management style entails telling people what to do, when to do it and how to do it. However, by managing activities, you feel like a babysitter and your employees feel micromanaged and disconnected. In the ugly style, the manager pushes the employee out of the way and does the task themselves; this tells the employee that you don’t believe in them and causes them to resent you.

 

Rather than managing through emotion or reacting to circumstances, White encouraged attendees to focus on training their teams and helping them become proficient in those tasks.

 

“Until you’re super clear on what you want, your team is going to spend their time trying to figure out what to do,” said White. “It’s easy to get so focused on what you’re doing that you forget why you’re doing it. You fixate on a broken process and nothing gets better.”


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