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Monday, 30 March 2020 20:45

A Full Service Life

Written by Skye Pournazari, Maryville Forum
Charlie Roush, of Hopkins, MO, stands in his living room. Roush spent 65 years serving his community through auto body repair, but also in numerous other ways. Charlie Roush, of Hopkins, MO, stands in his living room. Roush spent 65 years serving his community through auto body repair, but also in numerous other ways. Skye Pournazari

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“He’s the dad every kid always dreams of having,” said Roush’s daughter, Deena Poynter. She explained that after working a long day at the shop, Roush would take the time to stop and push her on a swing before doing anything else.

 

“It was that ‘You’re important enough I’m going to stop,’ and he did that for all four of us,” she said. “He was wonderful with all of us.”

 

Roush said the reason he got by so many years in the business was because he had “an awful patient wife. She understood that everything didn’t just go to five o’clock and cut off.”

 

However, because he was his own boss, occasionally he said they got to knock off at 3 or 4 p.m. if they wanted to go watch his grandchildren play ball.

 

“All told it’s been 63 to 64 years I’ve done body work in Hopkins,” he said.

 

Poynter joked that her father’s initials---Charles Amos Roush---spell CAR.

 

“I think it’s cute,” she said, laughing.

 

Oftentimes Roush would dedicate time teaching and mentoring high school votech students at his shop.

 

“Charlie is one of the greatest men I know,” said James Brown, who worked for Roush. “I’ve never heard that man get angry.”

 

Brown worked in the body shop from 1989 until he graduated high school in 1991. While his career took a different path than he had originally wanted, doing auto body work, Brown said he learned a lot from Roush.

 

“He taught me a lot both from an auto body standpoint and (about) patience,” he said. “He’s the most patient man I know.”

 

As a member of the Hopkins community, Brown said Roush is always willing to visit with people and ready with a good word to say.

 

“He’s always been a positive member of the community, in the church,” he said.

 

Not only did he provide training for those students, but also for two of his sons and four grandsons, who worked during summers gaining experience.

 

While they didn’t all go into the auto body repair field, they did receive a lot of good knowledge about cars and customer service, Poynter said.

 

“He was a good boss,” she said. “He expected them to be on time. He expected them to do what they were supposed to do. Of course, he was a kind and loving boss, but yet he had expectations. That was great. That’s why we all loved having our kids work for my dad, because we knew that’s what they were going to get.”

 

Roush not only kept community members mobile by way of his business, but moved himself easily throughout the community, helping with local events in and around the area, including coaching little league for 17 years, while his sons were in the league.


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