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Monday, 23 December 2019 16:07

GM’s Christine Sitek Shares Insights and Wisdom at AWAF’s Holiday Affair

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AWAF members enjoy networking with one another. (Pictured left to right: Board Member Kellie Treppa, Board Member Kathy Smith, and 2019 Board Member Marion Wells). AWAF members enjoy networking with one another. (Pictured left to right: Board Member Kellie Treppa, Board Member Kathy Smith, and 2019 Board Member Marion Wells). AWAF, Stonecrest Photography

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Sitek also advised, “Learn to say no. This is important. Some women feel like they have to say yes in order to be liked or to belong; however, with time, you will find that even if you say no, people will take notice that you make decisions super clear. They still see your ability to work hard, your ability to do things well, and they will still like you. Don’t let someone else tell your story or your narrative. Don’t let someone else speak for you. Make an effort to tell your own story, your way.”

 

For those who don’t yet have a very long story, Sitek advised taking on challenging, uncomfortable projects and assignments. “Get comfortable with getting uncomfortable. Once you do this one time, you learn to repeat it … and you get comfortable with the unknown. You master the ability to project confidence. There is a science behind this, it is often referred to as ‘fake it until you make it.’ It works. I’m proof of that. It really works. Believe in yourself and go for it.”

 

Discussing the significant changes occurring in the automotive energy, Sitek expressed excitement over autonomous vehicles and how they “are forcing us to be more competitive than ever and responsive in a different way. Today, it is wonderful to see companies take on a mission that is bigger than ourselves. It’s about the purpose, and this is extremely energizing. It is this energy, this purpose, that will give way to getting the employment and talent that we need.”

 

“I can’t count how many different people have played a key role in the advancement of my career – people of all shapes and sizes. Most have been men, including my bosses … and my husband has been the lowest-paid mentor. He truly has been key,” Sitek said when asked about the importance of mentors. “I would advise women to seek out multiple feedbacks for different perspectives because everyone’s experience is different. Find mentorship in multiple people. Build relationships with people. Don’t just call them when you need something. Take time to map this out. Determine who you need to know and be very strategic about it.”


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