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Friday, 15 November 2019 16:38

Digital Screens Make Diagnostics a Breeze for Automotive Students in NE

Chance Boersen, of Grand Island, NE, hones his diagnostic skills with the assistance of two new digital screens in the Automotive Technology department at North Platte Community College. Chance Boersen, of Grand Island, NE, hones his diagnostic skills with the assistance of two new digital screens in the Automotive Technology department at North Platte Community College. NPCC

New technology is putting North Platte Community College automotive students a step ahead in terms of industry standards.

A pair of 64-inch LG digital monitors were installed in the Automotive Technology department. Students began using them to assess and diagnose problems in vehicles.

 

“This is cutting edge, which is how we try to drive our program,” said Mike Janecek, automotive technology instructor. “We always want to be ahead of the curve.”

 

Previously, students learned by gathering around a laptop connected to a scan tool and oscilloscope.

 

“Now, no one has to huddle around a laptop on a cart,” said Janecek. “I can teach the entire class with large screens on the wall. Everybody can see, and everybody can understand.”

 

The new monitors feature an integrated content management system, allowing users to edit information, check schedules and use a group manager function without a separate computer.

 

They also come with built-in Wi-Fi, the abilities to execute several tasks at the same time and smooth content playback without an external media player and multiple device hook-ups.

 

“We now have a way of viewing more information at once,” Janecek said. “Gone are the days of clicking from one tab to the next. We can have everything we need to analyze posted on two screens.”

 

Also, instead of him demonstrating with the scan tool, Janecek can instruct students on the use of the scan tool while standing in the back row.

 

“The monitors allow the students to be even more hands-on than they already were, which is always a good thing because this is the type of diagnostics they will eventually be doing in the field,” Janecek said. “Technicians are just starting to roll out screens like these in their bays. The reason is that so much information has to be considered when determining vehicle issues. Displaying more info at once shortens the diagnostic time.”

 

More information about the college’s Automotive Technology program can be found online at mpcc.edu.

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