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John Yoswick

John YoswickJohn Yoswick is a freelance automotive writer based in Portland, Oregon, who has been writing about the collision industry since 1988. He is the editor of the weekly CRASH Network (for a free 4-week trial subscription, visit www.CrashNetwork.com).


He can be contacted at john@crashnetwork.com 

Tuesday, 06 September 2022 15:40

Insurers, Collision Repairers Discuss How to Improve Estimating, Claims Adjusting Process

Written by
Connie Hutton of Erie Insurance encourages shops and insurers to keep customers in the loop while claims are being handled. Connie Hutton of Erie Insurance encourages shops and insurers to keep customers in the loop while claims are being handled.

Index

...a little bit more information. And the shop should need it, too. Any time you sublet something, it’s on you, still. We’ll come back to you, not to them.”

 

Collision repairers on the panel were asked what operations they most struggle to get approved for payment.


“Safety inspections. It’s getting easier, but that’s definitely one,” Wagner said. “If you have structural damage on a Subaru and you’re writing to take the whole interior apart, and you have a bill-payer that’s not used to seeing that, that’s probably going to freak them out.”

 

Panelist Erin Solis of the Certified Collision Group referred back to Wagner’s reference to cloning.

 

Erin Solis web

Erin Solis of the Certified Collision Group said shops often struggle to get paid for safety inspections because too few shops actually do them.

 

“You want to clone them, but the rest of us want to clone you,” she told Wagner. “Because part of the reason why you can’t get paid for the R&I of the steering column on a Subaru when you have to measure it could be because you’re the only one in your market doing it.

 

“There are still a lot of repairers not doing the safety inspections, and I hear from shops all the time they are getting push back because [they are told] no one else in their market is doing it.”

 

Claims Handling Inconsistency

 

Wagner said one of his frustrations with how auto claims are adjusted is the inconsistency in what procedures get approved.

 

He pointed to two claims at his shop involving the same Lexus vehicle, with virtually the same damage and the same insurer involved. Shortly after the shop completed the first $17,000 repair to the vehicle, the customer hit a deer, resulting in similar damage and a $19,000 bill.

 

“With the first repair, there was a short-pay of about $2,500, and on the second repair there was a short-pay of about $2,500,” Wagner said. “But items that the insurer said on the first claim they would never pay, got paid on the second claim, no problem. And vice versa. It just seems like they reach a quitting point [when reviewing a claim], and decide, ‘That’s good enough.’”

 

Wagner also drew applause at CIC when he challenged...