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John Yoswick

John YoswickJohn Yoswick is a freelance automotive writer based in Portland, Oregon, who has been writing about the collision industry since 1988. He is the editor of the weekly CRASH Network (for a free 4-week trial subscription, visit www.CrashNetwork.com).


He can be contacted at john@crashnetwork.com 

Tuesday, 07 September 2021 20:55

Honda Increasing Crash Parts Production, Transitioning Certified Auto Body Shops Over Time

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Collision repairers need to be aware of the replacement procedure for the laser-brazed roof panel on the 2022 Honda Civic requires a combination of welding, adhesive and mechanical fasteners. Collision repairers need to be aware of the replacement procedure for the laser-brazed roof panel on the 2022 Honda Civic requires a combination of welding, adhesive and mechanical fasteners.

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Collision repair shops reporting difficulties in getting replacement parts this year may be glad to hear Honda is ramping up parts production.

“As we all know, back orders are really hitting the industry hard, regardless of the manufacturer,” Dane Rounkles, manager of wholesale collision parts for American Honda, said during a Guild 21 webinar in late summer. “So we went to senior management, and anything we stamp here in the U.S., we’ve asked for them to increase production to make the parts available.

 

"Now, some of you may still have some back orders on sheet metal, and that may be something we stamp in another country," Rounkles continued. "But we have increased greatly the availability of sheet metal parts, and we will continue to do so. Right now, I don’t have the quantities that we want of every part, but we are trying to get the common sheet metal items out to shops on a timely basis. We are checking our back orders and seeing which [other parts] we can ramp up production on.”

 

The automaker also used the webinar to highlight some information about the new 2022 Civic related to collision repairs. The vehicle, for example, has extended range blind spot information sensors on some trim packages.

 

“The original radar saw, I believe, 3 or 4 meters,” said Scott Kaboos, collision technical specialist for Honda. “This one can see 75 meters. So it’s much more intense of a radar.”

 

The system no longer requires a specific aiming inspection procedure, but instead is capable of self-learning while the vehicle is driven more than 18 mph. Those test driving the vehicle should be aware that until the self-learning is complete, the reset system is limited to 9.8 feet of detection.

 

There are also new limits on what repairs can be made to the areas on the rear bumper through which the radar system operates. Honda provides a printable template technicians can tape onto the bumper to determine where the radar wave area is.

 

“If within that area, there is a crack, a dent, a gouge, anything like that, it cannot be repaired,” Kaboos said. “As a matter of fact, they tell us we cannot even use touch-up paint in that area or it can mess with the radar. If it has some fine scratches, you can polish, but you need to...


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