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John Yoswick

John YoswickJohn Yoswick is a freelance automotive writer based in Portland, Oregon, who has been writing about the collision industry since 1988. He is the editor of the weekly CRASH Network (for a free 4-week trial subscription, visit www.CrashNetwork.com).


He can be contacted at john@crashnetwork.com 

Thursday, 10 September 2020 21:13

Committee Demonstrates How Same Part Can Be Described Differently

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Ken Weiss said some parts suppliers are genuinely unclear as to how to identify their parts in electronic parts platforms or estimating systems, while others may be trying to “game” the system. Ken Weiss said some parts suppliers are genuinely unclear as to how to identify their parts in electronic parts platforms or estimating systems, while others may be trying to “game” the system.

Index

The Collision Industry Conference (CIC) Parts and Materials Committee is continuing to push for more consistency in how parts are defined and described within the industry.

During the virtual CIC this summer, the committee showed how the list of parts categories varies among parts platforms and estimating systems.

 

CCC ONE has six parts type categories, for example, while Audatex and Mitchell have seven. Audatex has an “OE surplus” category, while CCC has “optional OEM” and Mitchell has “OE discount.”

 

The parts platforms that feed into the estimating solutions have their own categories.

 

APU Solutions, for example, segments out “surplus OEM” from “recovered OEM,” two categories not even found---by those names---in the estimating systems. APU’s Eric Marrello said “surplus OEM” parts are new OEM parts in OEM packaging, whereas “recovered OEM” are take-off parts, OEM parts that may have been temporarily installed or painted and then removed.

 

“We hope longer term that the industry will move in the direction to break those two part types out,” Marrello said. “Certainly we need to agree upon those definitions. But we saw five or seven years ago that those really aren’t the same part category. They need to have a different segmentation.”

 

The committee showed several flowcharts that demonstrate how all these variations in parts categories can result in the exact same part being described two different ways on estimates.

 

In the first, a vendor selling OEM parts outside of the authorized OEM channel enters those parts into a platform that uses the “OEM surplus” category for such parts. That platform feeds into an estimating system that uses the “optional OEM” label for those parts. California regulators, however, prohibit the use of the “opt-OEM” label.


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