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John Yoswick

John YoswickJohn Yoswick is a freelance automotive writer based in Portland, Oregon, who has been writing about the collision industry since 1988. He is the editor of the weekly CRASH Network (for a free 4-week trial subscription, visit www.CrashNetwork.com).


He can be contacted at john@crashnetwork.com 

Sometimes the best way to look forward is to spend a few minutes looking back.
That’s a concept that came to mind recently looking through a file of industry-related notes and articles from 15 years ago. What can the industry today learn from the ideas and topics being discussed then? What has changed – for better or worse – and are there areas in which virtually no progress has been made? And what should we be doing differently now to ensure we’re not just treading water 15 years from now in 2022?

If you think the collision repair industry is changing rapidly, spend a little time talking with the owner of your nearby auto salvage yard:

Consolidation? Independent yards around the country are being gobbled up by larger corporations like LKQ Corporation and Ford Motor Company.

E-commerce and computer technology? Body shops can shop for used parts on-line at several websites, including iSalvage.com, NextPart.com, PlanetSalvage.com, and CarStation.com, and many yards are connected to each other by co-op networks such as United Recyclers Group.

Seemingly conceding that its previous position on estimating system data was untenable, ADP announced in April it was putting on hold its plan to encrypt that data and make it unusable by unlicensed third parties such as Internet claims management companies. 

Spend a few minutes talking to another shop owner —no matter whether he or she is across town or across the country —and you’re likely to hear about some concepts and ideas that are being tried – or have long been found successful. Here’s a compilation of some ideas, tips and processes successful shop owners have recently shared.

With the sluggish growth or even decline in sales many shops have experienced in recent years, the technician shortage and recruitment of employees have not been the troublesome issue they were for the industry during the late 1990s. 

Concerns about the estimating databases, the reversal of the decision in the State Farm non-OEM parts lawsuit, the collapse of another consolidator and an ongoing battle over the "right to repair" were among the most talked-about topics in the collision industry this past year.

There's a simple rule in business that if you want to increase profits, you need to either increase sales and revenue, or decrease costs and expenses. 

In the three years since "event data recorders" (often referred to as "black boxes") in vehicles really began to arise as an issue of interest for collision repairers, there has been significant activity related to EDRs on a number of fronts: 

Shop owners struggling to remain profitable say they are increasingly focusing on the paint side of the shop, looking for innovative ways to squeeze even more productivity out of paint booths, paint products and paint personnel.