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Tuesday, 23 November 2021 20:53

Toyota Busts the Car Microchip Shortage

Written by Steven Symes, Motorious

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Unless you’ve been living in a cave or under a rock, you know for about a year automakers have been suffering from a shortage of microprocessor chips, necessary for a number of features.

This has meant auto giants shuttering factories for weeks on end, trimming back on production and even storing unfinished cars in hopes they can install the chips at a later date.

 

With predictions of this situation being alleviated in a matter or months or even a couple of years, it might be shocking to hear Toyota has already found a solution.

 

That’s right, the only big automaker to have skipped out on most of the chip shortage nonsense in North America but ultimately had to scale production back by 40%, to the glee of its critics, is once again alone in its cherry situation.

 

Toyota has announced it will be back to full global production capacity in December. In fact, the company said it anticipates churning out 800,000 vehicles in December, up from the 760,000 it made in December 2020.

 

This update should have Ford, GM, Stellantis, Volkswagen, Nissan and others absolutely seething. After all, it’s been proven consumers in North America and other markets have quite the appetite for new cars. If Toyota dealerships are the only ones with any vehicle stock to speak of, it doesn’t take a genius to realize the automaker will clean up.

 

That might even mean some shoppers switch their brand loyalty to Toyota for years to come, meaning this change might cause some long-term market shifts.

 

Speaking of Ford and GM, the two American automakers are reportedly looking into making their own computer chips as a way to get out of this horrible situation and never return to it. Ford told the media it's in a strategic agreement with GlobalFoundries Inc., based in the U.S. We don't know any details about that deal.

 

GM President Mark Reuss disclosed his company is...


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