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Wednesday, 06 January 2021 19:28

Panel Reviews Why OEM Repair Procedure Legislation Has Mostly Failed to Be Enacted

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A virtual panel discussion on OEM repair procedure legislation included, clockwise from top left, Darrell Amberson, ASA’s Bob Redding, Jina Petrarca-Karampetsos, Sandy Blalock and Wayne Weikel. A virtual panel discussion on OEM repair procedure legislation included, clockwise from top left, Darrell Amberson, ASA’s Bob Redding, Jina Petrarca-Karampetsos, Sandy Blalock and Wayne Weikel.

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With more than a dozen states proposing legislation over the past three years related to the use of OEM collision repair procedures, why have nearly all of them failed to be enacted?

That was the question at the heart of a Governmental Committee panel discussion during a recent virtual Collision Industry Conference (CIC) this month.

 

One reason cited: Opposition to the idea of pushing for or requiring the use of OEM procedures from alternative parts industry.

 

“I think the biggest problem we have is there are OEM repair procedures that very blatantly deny the use of aftermarket or recycled original equipment parts,” said panelist Sandy Blalock, executive director of the Automotive Recyclers Association. “So we have very serious concerns that that would be pushed even more if any of these pieces of legislation get passed.”

 

Panelist Wayne Weikel of the Alliance for Automotive Innovation, a trade group representing the automakers that manufacture nearly all the passenger vehicles sold in the U.S., pointed out in some of the state legislative efforts, automakers “took parts off the table,” by agreeing to legislative language “saying that, notwithstanding what OEM repair procedures may say about parts, you’re supposed to follow the repair procedures.”

 

But Blalock said the OEM position statements remain.

 

“As long as there’s anything out there that is telling people it’s not wise to use [alternative] parts, or that they do not recommend that they be used, this is going to be an issue for us,” she said.

 

“And that’s why you see why compromise on this will be difficult,” Weikel said. “Against all of my members’ views on parts, we tried to focus just on procedures, and even after we’ve done that, we continue to hear objections such as these. I can tell you, our manufacturers are not going to walk away from saying that the best part is a new OEM part. That’s just the reality.”

 

The insurance industry also pushed back against...


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