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Monday, 09 November 2020 23:39

2020 Autonomous Vehicle Market Update

Written by Elana Ashanti Jefferson, PropertyCasualty360
Click to enlarge. In 2020, safety concerns and regulatory hurdles are putting the brakes on the mainstream adoption of autonomous vehicles. Click to enlarge. In 2020, safety concerns and regulatory hurdles are putting the brakes on the mainstream adoption of autonomous vehicles. Illustration by Shaw Nielsen from the November 2020 issue of NU Property & Casualty magazine

Index

...more than technological hurdles and that this landscape will “hold back autonomous cars from becoming public anytime soon,” according to Counterpoint Research.

 

“The automotive industry is still a long way from manufacturing self-driving vehicles anytime soon with challenges remaining in consumer awareness, standardization, economics, regulations/compliances, privacy, safety and security,” writes Counterpoint Research Global Consulting Director Vinay Piparsania.

 

Testing uptick

 

It’s important to note that vehicles with semi-autonomous functions are already widely available with such Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) as cameras and sensors. Self-driving technology also includes radar, lidar, sonar and GPS.

 

The Society of Automotive Engineers has determined five levels of automated driving functionality, with the lowest level (0) indicating the software has no sustained control over the vehicle, and the highest level (5) indicating the vehicle needs no human intervention to operate.

Waymo and other autonomous vehicle technologists have long argued this technology has the capacity to make driving dramatically safer.

 

Consider this observation from an experienced truck driver that tests big rigs for Waymo Via, the company’s trucking division: “By working with the engineering teams and sharing all about truck behavior and the rules of the road, I’m helping the Waymo Driver see and learn what I have. It’s my job to impart the lessons I’ve learned the hard way so that the Waymo Driver is the safest it can be. That is the largest impact I can have---knowing that society will benefit from my lived experience for years and years to come.”

 

After pushing back its original timeline, GM Cruise announced in October it plans to begin testing unmanned autonomous vehicles in San Francisco after the company received a permit from the California Department of Motor Vehicles to remove human backup drivers from his test vehicles. Waymo, Autox Technologies, Nuro and Zoox all have received similar permits.

 

“Before the end of the year, we’ll be sending cars...


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