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Thursday, 10 September 2020 19:33

Speaker Highlights Common Challenges Involved in ADAS Calibration

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 If sandbags are used to simulate the weight of a full tank of gas while calibrating a vehicle’s ADAS, they may need to placed in particular parts of the vehicle, based on where the tank is located.  If sandbags are used to simulate the weight of a full tank of gas while calibrating a vehicle’s ADAS, they may need to placed in particular parts of the vehicle, based on where the tank is located.

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Speaking at August’s Collision Industry Conference (CIC), Bob Pattengale, technical systems manager for Opus Intelligent Vehicle Support, discussed some of the challenges collision repairers face in calibrating various advanced driver assistance systems.

Pattengale cited as an example a vehicle that had one or two tires damaged in an accident.

 

“Typically we’re looking to make sure the vehicle has the same wear patterns on the tires all the way around the vehicle,” Pattengale said. “If you’re a shop and you have a brand new tire on the right rear, but the other three are at the 70% or 80% worn level, what’s the decision? Is the insurance company going to pay for all four new tires? Or just the one? That’s something the industry needs to answer. Technically you should have a matching set of tires.”

 

Using the Honda procedures to calibrate the blind spot monitoring system on a late-model Accord as another example, Pattengale noted proper calibration requires a full tank of gas.

 

Sandbags could be used to simulate the weight of the gas---about 5 lbs. per gallon---in a vehicle without a full tank, he said, but they need to be placed in the portion of the vehicle just above the fuel tank. On the Accord, that means some weight on both the left and right sides of the vehicle, because it has a saddle fuel tank.

 

“We need to try to be as accurate as we possibly can to mirroring a full tank of fuel,” he said.

 

Pattengale, who prior to last year spent more than a dozen years with Bosch, said he realized early on in his current position he needed to think differently about calibrations in a body shop versus a mechanical facility. On one of the first vehicles he calibrated in a body shop, he found the Allen screw used to adjust a radar unit was seized up, a common problem depending on vehicle age and geographical area, he said.


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