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Monday, 24 August 2020 19:02

How Insurers Can Ensure Clients' Vehicles are Properly Disinfected

Written by Rochelle Thielen, PropertyCasualty360
During the pandemic, many insurers are paying repair shops to disinfect and clean a vehicle for contamination before it is returned to the customer. During the pandemic, many insurers are paying repair shops to disinfect and clean a vehicle for contamination before it is returned to the customer. Shutterstock

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Insurance companies operate in the world of mitigating risk. But the outbreak of COVID-19 has forced insurers to reassess even the most basic of processes that now carry with them additional dangers.

This is especially true when it comes to customers interacting with third-parties doing repairs to their vehicle, which may, in turn, expose your customer upon receipt of their newly repaired car.

 

Whether it’s roadside, mechanical or body shop repairs, in most cases, there will be some level of physical contact between the service provider and a vehicle that may need to be addressed before your customer is confident that you’ve addressed any concern over contamination.

 

Insurers regularly provide specific requirements for safe vehicle repair and use audits, photographic evidence and documentation to ensure these requirements are followed during the process. In our “new normal,” many insurers also are paying repair shops to disinfect and clean a vehicle for contamination before it is returned to the customer.

 

But how is an insurer supposed to know that they are getting what they are paying for and that their customer’s vehicle is safely decontaminated?

 

There are ways to hold shops accountable; here is some advice from the experience we’ve had in partnering with both insurers and experts in the field of vehicle disinfection.

 

Set guidelines on how to properly disinfect a vehicle

 

Insurers should set specific, minimum guidelines today on how repaired vehicles should be cleaned so that they protect themselves from unnecessary claims in the future.

 

The proper disinfection of a car for the safety of anyone closely interacting with it starts by wiping down and spraying the entire interior of a vehicle with disinfectants by someone wearing properly fitted PPE, specifically a mask and gloves. Emphasize that special attention needs to be paid to high touch point surfaces like seatbelts, headrests, dashboards and steering wheels.

 

Any surface that is constantly and commonly touched should be considered a high-value surface. These surfaces especially should be thoroughly wiped down, and not just sprayed.


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