fbpx
Thursday, 16 August 2018 20:58

Hey, What Gives? Where Are My Automated Vehicle Discounts?!

Written by Murali Chidurala and Tom Super, PropertyCasualty360.com
Automated features such as forward collision warning and autonomous emergency braking systems are proving effective in reducing front-to-rear crash rates. Automated features such as forward collision warning and autonomous emergency braking systems are proving effective in reducing front-to-rear crash rates. Shutterstock

Index

It’s only a matter of time. At some point, many believe, insurance premiums will come down as vehicles use technology that leads to better, safer driving and lower costs. It’s a pleasant story, but one that has yet to come true.

 

While mass adoption is likely years away, a number of technologies that improve driver safety are already gaining ground. Partially automated features such as forward collision warning and autonomous emergency braking systems are proving effective in reducing front-to-rear crash rates.

 

Data from the IIHS study on the effectiveness of forward collision warning and autonomous emergency braking systems in reducing front-to-rear crash rates illustrates this trend. Forward collision warning (FCW) systems reduced front-to-rear crash rates by 27 percent and front-to-rear injury crash rates by 20 percent.

 

Low-speed autonomous emergency braking (ABS) reduced front-to-rear crash rates [by] 43 percent and front-to-rear injury crash rates 45 percent. Better yet, both FCW and ABS reduced front-to-rear-crash rates by 50 percent and front-to-rear injury crash rates by 56 percent.

 

In fact, according to IIHS estimates, having all U.S. vehicles equipped with FCW with ABS would have meant approximately 1 million fewer crashes and more than 400,000 fewer injuries in 2014.

 

Unfortunately, these impressive technologies may ultimately plateau in their effectiveness for one simple reason: human error.

 

Indeed, industry experts remain uncertain about how features designed to reduce the number of accidents will ultimately impact drivers’ behavior. The concern is that these technologies may actually have the inverse effect: Consumers become less responsive to traffic conditions, leading to a higher frequency of accidents.

 

What’s considered automated---and how widespread is it?


Currently, the NHTSA defines various levels of automation in six different categories:

 

PC360 1

(Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration)

 

As automated features have become more common, many new vehicles now contain capabilities in the first or second category, such as auto lane departure warning or auto brake assist.

 

Consider the data on Factory-Installed Electronic/ADAS Equipment on U.S. Cars and Light Trucks, ’16 Model Year article, from WardsAuto:

 

• Rear Camera 86 percent
• Rear Parking Sensors 35 percent
• 360° Camera System 6 percent
• Blind Spot Detection 30 percent
• Lane Departure Warning 20 percent
• Adaptive Cruise Control 11 percent
• Collision Warning 17 percent


Previous Page Continue reading »