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Friday, 18 May 2018 19:53

Classic Cars and Claims Fraud

Written by Rick Drewry, Property Casualty 360
Classic car owners facing unforeseen costs have been known to file file fraudulent claims to help cover the cost of restoration. Classic car owners facing unforeseen costs have been known to file file fraudulent claims to help cover the cost of restoration. Shutterstock

Index


When a classic car stored in a locked garage suddenly goes missing, it’s difficult to give credence to a theft claim when there is no or conflicting evidence of forced entry. An intact garage with the lock undisturbed or broken window glass scattered on the outside of the garage may be signs that bring a theft claim into question.


Burnouts, doughnuts or power slides, among other ill-advised driving moves, are sometimes just too tempting to resist in many muscle cars of the ‘60s and ‘70s, but the resulting accident can be hard to acknowledge to an insurer. Some drivers might decide to spin a fantastic tale, resulting in claims fraud, rather than admit to the facts. Their reluctance to stick to the truth only complicates an otherwise covered loss.


Fact or Fiction?

 

When it comes to claims fraud, distinguishing fact from fiction can sometimes be tricky. Did the car accidentally slide down the hill into a ditch or did it have some help? Did someone really break into the garage to vandalize the car? Why didn’t anyone see the car being keyed on a busy street?


Most claims are just what they seem … legitimate. But an awareness of some red flags may help reduce insurance fraud and deliver the best possible service to policyholders.


We thank Property Casualty 360 for reprint permission.


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