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Friday, 18 May 2018 17:48

Experts Weigh in on the Future of the Automobile

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The Petersen Automotive Museum, in partnership with the Los Angeles World Affairs Council, recently held “The Future of the Automobile Conference.” The Petersen Automotive Museum, in partnership with the Los Angeles World Affairs Council, recently held “The Future of the Automobile Conference.” Courtesy of Petersen Automotive Museum

Index


Ryan Westrom, mobility partnerships lead for Greenfield Labs at Ford Smart Mobility 


“I think today, as we talk about the technologies of autonomous vehicles to come and the form factor and talk about them as machines and metal boxes … Any of these devices---cars that have been and the cars that will come---operate for the human, the human that is at the center of that design equation. This transformation is coming and we have this opportunity in front of us to shape it. We can shape it well or shape it poorly. I believe if we start with the human at the center of that equation we can shape it extremely well. The relationship that we have had with cars over the past 125 years has really been deeply emotional at its core. We think of the car as almost a member of our family. We assign meaning to it. I think that meeting that emotional need to have connection is something that really provides an opportunity, and how are we going to have that emotional connection with the autonomous vehicles of the future? If we have anything to do with it, there’s going to continue to be vehicles, but smart vehicles in a smart world.”


Brian Witten, senior director, advanced technologies for Symantec


“Over the last 20 years, I’ve built security for spacecraft, aircraft, consumer electronics, computers, and tens of millions of connected cars. What I’ve learned is there’s never any single silver bullet. Building security into anything is about protecting the communication, protecting the cars themselves, and keeping them up to date---because security is never done---and then having a way of looking for those really stealthy, sophisticated attackers. That’s not easy to do. The good news is that a lot of the auto makers have started doing this for millions of cars. The bad news is there are about 100 million cars a year that shipped. The majority of them are without enough security, and the ones that are building security in the cars are just starting to build one or two of those cornerstones, not all three or four. We’re still very early in this journey. We’ve already seen cars run off the road, and that’s disconcerting. For our cars to be safe in the future, they are going to need to be digitally secure.”


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