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Gary Ledoux

From the start of the “modern” collision shop in the late 1940s up through the 1970s, body shops, as a business, were fairly crude by most standards.

Those who have been in the collision industry for a long time remember the 1980s as the advent of automotive unibody construction.

It seemed like we had just gotten over the decline of the hippie movement, and the rise and fall of disco and a TV actor being president of the U.S.

In 1989, Mark Gibson started painting Peterbilt hoods in his father’s garage - an inauspicious beginning to what would later become one of the premier heavy-duty truck body shops in the country; Diversified Body and Paint Shop located in Denver.

During the 2nd annual HD Repair Forum event held in Fort Worth, Texas, in March 2019, John Spoto, National Heavy Duty Truck Commercial Fleet manager for the 3M Company gave a fascinating presentation on the effects of a crash and how so much can happen in a very short amount of time.

Fifty years ago this month, September 1969, I took my first job in the automotive industry.

The collision industry went through many changes during the 1970s.

Most automotive and HD truck shops—mechanical and collision-repair shops—need more technicians.

Auto body associations had been around since the 1940s.

Most people in the auto collision industry agree that the collision industry was born around 1946.

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