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Friday, 12 July 2019 20:13

Truck Topics: Hey Buddy … Got a Millisecond?

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Index

 

40 Milliseconds

 

As the crush zones deform, the crash energy is transferred to the dash, front cowl, floor pan and rockers. At this point, some sheet metal may have been bent, some kinked. Bent metal, depending on its strength and hardness may be bent back into shape. Kinked metal generally has to be replaced, especially if it is high-strength steel. (Straightening kinked metal could weaken it making it collapse in a subsequent crash.)

 

50 Milliseconds

 

The engine assembly contacts the dash. The “A” pillar, roof, door pillar, rockers and floor pan carry the balance for the crash load.

 

67 Milliseconds

 

The truck has reached maximum deformation. The penetration into the occupant area was controlled and limited due to the construction of the truck and materials used. The crash load was directed around and under the truck occupants. But even in the moment, the truck has completely stopped, momentum continues possibly forcing the payload through the back of the cab.

 

100 Milliseconds

 Event is complete

 

Now, the damage estimating and repair process begins. Referring again to a Volvo collision repair bulletin, they specifically point out, “When major body damage occurs, you should replace entire sections instead of changing parts within a section. Replacing an entire section preserves the structural integrity of the cab and generally takes less time.”

 

When reviewing or estimating a crash, the primary point of impact, probably the front of the cab, will no doubt get the most attention as it is the most obvious place to look. However, there could be considerable “Indirect Damage” which could include the frame or any part of the truck as the force of the collision was dissipated through the entire vehicle. This is why it is so important to look over the entire truck, not just the point of impact.


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