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Ed Attanasio

Ed Attanasio is an automotive journalist based in San Francisco. Ed enjoys sports of all kinds and is a part time stand-up comedian.

 

He can be reached at era39@aol.com.

Tuesday, 10 August 2021 09:00

Where Film and Auto Body Shops Collide

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In 2007, a production company created a sitcom, "American Body Shop," but after one short season of nine episodes, it was not renewed. In 2007, a production company created a sitcom, "American Body Shop," but after one short season of nine episodes, it was not renewed. IMDb

Index

...filming the pilot and then sending it around to the networks, which rarely works. But in this case, it did---at least for one season.

 

Body shops have appeared in a lot of movies. In most cases, nefarious and highly illegal things happen there. There were body shops in "The Wolf of Wall Street," "Mad Max" (“You bend it, we mend it.”), "Corvette Summer" and "Christine"---I almost forgot Big Pussy had a shop in "The Sopranos."

In the Canadian series, "The Trailer Park Boys," the main characters start a body shop, Success Auto Body & Repair, in an episode titled “Countdown to Liquor Day.” After being released from prison, the boys start a body shop, figuring they learned collision repair while in prison. But, as we all know, it’s not that easy and the Trailer Park Boys failed terribly.

 

Film producer Jose Herrera of Mio Productions in Silicon Valley has an impressive resume in film that includes producing award-winning films. He believes a body shop would be an outstanding setting for either a reality show or a sitcom, and that’s why he is working on a screenplay and a treatment for a dramatic series.

 

“The environment in a busy body shop, with a whole slew of characters who all have their own agendas, is perfect for TV," Herrera said. "The David vs. Goliath relationship between the insurance companies and the collision repair industry is ideal for the screen because every protagonist needs at least one villain. Then, of course, you have the customers, each with their own backstory as well.”

 

Herrera knows he wants to depict a body shop as accurately as he can, so he started hanging out in shops until the pandemic hit.

 

“I want to pick up the vibe and meet these people. Every shop needs that one old technician who is fighting new technology and another younger one who is excited about doing things a little more out-of-the-box," Herrera said. "New technology has changed the industry on many levels and a lot of shops are struggling to catch up, so that is...