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Ed Attanasio

Ed Attanasio is an automotive journalist based in San Francisco. Ed enjoys sports of all kinds and is a part time stand-up comedian.

 

He can be reached at era39@aol.com.

Wednesday, 08 April 2020 23:00

CCC Analyst Forecasts Impact of COVID-19 on Collision Repair Industry

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Director/Industry Analyst Susanna Gotsch from CCC Informational Services forecasts a rocky road that will drive up claim and repair cycle times for the rest of the year. Director/Industry Analyst Susanna Gotsch from CCC Informational Services forecasts a rocky road that will drive up claim and repair cycle times for the rest of the year.

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Trying to figure out what the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be to the automotive, insurance and collision repair industries is literally impossible.

Everyone is speculating and relying on news stories that change hourly, so unless you trust psychics like Sylvia Browne or Carnac The Magnificent, you’re only guessing.

 

Director/Industry Analyst Susanna Gotsch from CCC Information Services Inc. is a 28-year veteran, so she’s been there and done that when it comes to interpreting numbers and hoping to predict what’s going to happen next.

 

Her job is to eliminate guesswork to ferret out the facts. No one knows when we will all get back to our “normal” lives, but Gotsch’s historical perspective supported by data is invaluable for anyone who works in the automotive industry within any capacity.

 

Gotsch has written the "Crash Course," CCC’s annual publication on trends affecting collision repair and total loss costs, since 1995. This publication has become a key resource for the industry in understanding how broader trends within the economy, new and used vehicle marketplaces and collision industry are affecting auto claim frequency and costs.

 

Gotsch also consults with the development of CCC’s industry-leading data warehouse and reporting products.

 

What we are facing now is unprecedented as it affects both our livelihoods and our health, Gotsch said, meaning that it’s hard to compare to anything else that has happened in our lives.

 

“We’ve obviously never been here before, so we are comparing this to prior epidemics or major economic disruptions and right now we’re seeing the worst of both," Gotsch said. "When the SARS epidemic hit the Far East in 2002-2003, car sales plummeted. But what’s interesting is that after the epidemic was over, auto sales went up significantly. We don’t know the reasons for that specifically, but we suspect that people living in urban populations didn’t want to use public transportation anymore.”

 

History shows us the U.S. has seen overall miles driven in this country fall during recessionary periods, Gotsch said.


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