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"Working Small and Effective" was the title of a class at the International Autobody Congress and Exposition (NACE) in Dallas, Texas in early December, but it could have been an apt theme for the event. Many wondered whether NACE would "feel the impact" (the actual theme of the show) of the five major paint companies being absent from the trade show floor. Indeed, attendance by both shops and vendors was down. (For details, see "NACE by the numbers".) 

Used or "recyclable" parts were the focus of discussion during a number of other presentations at the Collision Industry Conference (CIC) held in mid-March in Nashville, Tennessee. 

Throughout the Las Vegas Convention Center the 35,000 attendees at last month's NACE seemed to be talking as much about the event itself as they did about the usual industry announcements, speakers and the "good deals" to be had on the trade show floor.

Sometimes the best way to look forward is to spend a few minutes looking back.
That’s a concept that came to mind recently looking through a file of industry-related notes and articles from 15 years ago. What can the industry today learn from the ideas and topics being discussed then? What has changed – for better or worse – and are there areas in which virtually no progress has been made? And what should we be doing differently now to ensure we’re not just treading water 15 years from now in 2022?

If you think the collision repair industry is changing rapidly, spend a little time talking with the owner of your nearby auto salvage yard:

Consolidation? Independent yards around the country are being gobbled up by larger corporations like LKQ Corporation and Ford Motor Company.

E-commerce and computer technology? Body shops can shop for used parts on-line at several websites, including iSalvage.com, NextPart.com, PlanetSalvage.com, and CarStation.com, and many yards are connected to each other by co-op networks such as United Recyclers Group.

Seemingly conceding that its previous position on estimating system data was untenable, ADP announced in April it was putting on hold its plan to encrypt that data and make it unusable by unlicensed third parties such as Internet claims management companies. 

Spend a few minutes talking to another shop owner —no matter whether he or she is across town or across the country —and you’re likely to hear about some concepts and ideas that are being tried – or have long been found successful. Here’s a compilation of some ideas, tips and processes successful shop owners have recently shared.

With the sluggish growth or even decline in sales many shops have experienced in recent years, the technician shortage and recruitment of employees have not been the troublesome issue they were for the industry during the late 1990s. 

Concerns about the estimating databases, the reversal of the decision in the State Farm non-OEM parts lawsuit, the collapse of another consolidator and an ongoing battle over the "right to repair" were among the most talked-about topics in the collision industry this past year.