Monday, 18 September 2017 17:02

Hot Rod Captivates Students at Aims Community College in CO

Written by James Redmond, Greeley Tribune
Daniel Vehse starts up the engine to the hot rod as a crowd gathers around to see at the Aims Automotive and Technology Center, 1120 Southgate Drive, in Windsor, CO. Vehse, co-creator of the hot rod, designed it with the Jerry Magnuson before Magnuson died. The car was Magnuson's final project. Daniel Vehse starts up the engine to the hot rod as a crowd gathers around to see at the Aims Automotive and Technology Center, 1120 Southgate Drive, in Windsor, CO. Vehse, co-creator of the hot rod, designed it with the Jerry Magnuson before Magnuson died. The car was Magnuson's final project. Joshua Polson, The Greeley Tribune

The hot rod's bright, red paint job caught Abel Flores' eye.

Flores, 18, a Fort Lupton resident and Aims Community College automotive collision repair student, said he likes painting cars.


"The paint job is one of the first things people notice," Flores said.


He certainly noticed the expert paint job on the Trackmaster hot rod on display at the Aims Automotive and Technology Center, 1120 Southgate Drive in Windsor, CO.


Flores stood in a crowd of more than 70 huddled around the mechanical marvel. He took a couple photos with his phone and when everyone started to leave, he hung behind for a moment to get a closer look.


"The paint job is so detailed," he said. "Everything about (the hot rod) took so much effort and attention to detail."


The 1923 Roadster was the last hot rod engineered and built by Jerry Magnuson. Now deceased, Magnuson, a legend in the hot rod community, was a substantial supporter of the Aims automotive programs, Aims Automotive Director Fred Brown said.


In 2010, Magnuson built "Magnatude," which won Hot Rod Magazine's Car of the Year Award.


Magnuson's second---and final---car was finished earlier this year. The car features a hand-fabricated body based on a 1923 Model T roadster.


On Sept. 11, the hot rod's co-builder Daniel Vehse talked Aims students and instructors through the process of designing, tweaking and building the vehicle.


The presentation, Brown said, was reminiscent of the one Magnuson would give when he used to visit the school.


A local, Magnuson grew up in Greeley and Eaton and started his own custom auto shop as a high school sophomore. In 1957, he helped establish the Igniters Car Club of Weld County, which still supports the Aims Car Show each year.


From there, he had a number of careers in the automotive industry, including working as a franchisee of Snap-On Tools, a mechanic on the crew of racing star Dan Gurney and finally, owner of Magnuson Products Co.


He always supported Aims and the students there, Brown said. Monday morning's presentation and Vehse's visit with the hot rod carried on that tradition.


We thank Greeley Tribune for reprint permission.  

Read 407 times