Tom Franklin

Tom Franklin (122)

Tom Franklin has been a sales and marketing consultant for forty years, specializing in automotive and auto body. He has written numerous books and provides marketing solutions and services for many businesses. He can be reached at (323) 871-6862 or at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Wednesday, 31 December 2003 17:00

Re-structuring for renewal

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Nature provides us with many wondrous examples of renewal. The snake sheds his skin and appears with a new one. The caterpillar morphs into a colorful butterfly. In fact most of the cells of the human body are gradually replaced over a period of about seven years. As we once again move into a new year, perhaps it's time to renew and re-create a powerful forward thrust to gain new or better or more profitable business.
Last modified on Friday, 09 March 2007 18:36
Saturday, 31 January 2004 17:00

Dare to double your business in 2004!

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"In the long run, men hit only what they aim at."

                 -Henry David Thoreau, 1854                                   
 

Last modified on Tuesday, 06 March 2007 15:36
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We recently had an unpleasant experience with a service provider. It wasn't that his work was bad. He was a good craftsman, with state-of-the-art tools and equipment. The quality of his work was good, but he lacked the most important quality we all look for when we choose someone to serve us: trust. 

Last modified on Tuesday, 06 March 2007 15:41
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Reactive (adj.): Tending to be responsive or to react to a stimulus; characterized by reaction. 

Last modified on Tuesday, 20 February 2007 16:03
Wednesday, 30 June 2004 17:00

Start marketing early and follow through

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From time to time, a client calls me to say business is way down. He needs to do some powerful marketing and sales right away! This is already a silly request because, in general, marketing efforts take time to develop and to realize a result. The best time to market is when you don't really need the business. By the time you're desperate for more business, it's usually too late.
Last modified on Tuesday, 20 February 2007 13:15
Saturday, 31 July 2004 17:00

Weaving a wider web to catch more business

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Toward the end of 1980, I picked up a book entitled "The Luck Factor" by Max Gunther. In his book, Gunther tells the stories of some of the world's luckiest people, along with the stories of some of the unluckiest people. What I found most interesting was his observation that the luckiest people he wrote about all shared five very specific traits and patterns of behavior that contributed to their "luck." These traits were conspicuously missing in the lives of the unlucky people. 

Last modified on Thursday, 15 February 2007 14:25
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Charlie arrives at the shop an hour before opening time as usual. It seems impossible to get a day's work done between the 8:00 a.m. opening time and the 6:00 p.m. closing time. He rarely gets out of the shop before 7:30 or 8:00 p.m. And this is during a relatively slow period. What is it that is killing his time (and his family life)? 

Last modified on Wednesday, 14 February 2007 18:43
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During the many years I have consulted with body shops, I've noticed one major difference between the most successful and those that are just getting by. The best shops always have at least one outstanding estimator that I would rate as an "Olympic-class" salesperson. 

Last modified on Wednesday, 14 February 2007 14:15
Friday, 31 December 2004 17:00

Redefining expertise can increase target markets

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What do automotive service buyers think of their local collision repair shop - compared to other automotive services? They probably see their mechanic as the expert who fixes their engine, maintains brakes, suspension, oil, lubrication, and more. And they may have an expert who repairs and maintains their transmission. So what expertise do they attribute to collision repair shop people? Are we fixed in their minds as only being capable of pounding out dents, replacing body panels and straightening frames or unibodies? If so, we may be losing a large piece of the market. 

Last modified on Tuesday, 13 February 2007 14:44
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For the past three years I've watched one shop employ a "goodwill ambassador" who makes the rounds once a month, calling on agents, some DRP directors, dealership managers, fleet managers and more. This "ambassador" delivers to each target person, a newsletter, a pen and/or pad, and sometimes candy, pastry, a plant or other special item. The newsletter delivers the "sales pitch" so the messenger doesn't have to. 

Last modified on Friday, 09 March 2007 17:38
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People generally hate surprises - probably because many surprises are unpleasant. People hate to be surprised to find out they won't get their car back on time, or that they will have to put out additional cash to get their job done. We all hate to be surprised by a bigger tax bill than we expected, or by an assessment that's going to cost us dearly. 

Last modified on Monday, 12 February 2007 12:36
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